Articles for Employers

Questions to Consider When Hiring Your First (Or Next) Personal Trainer

Good-Fit

We’ve had a few independent Personal Trainers ask about what they should take into account when hiring their first Personal Trainer.

Following are a few questions that can help put the recruiting process in perspective (for all hires)…

Can you offer more than just Personal Training hours?

You’re the best person to focus on strategic matters, so it’s beneficial to not be weighed down by too many mundane tasks. Have you reached a point with your business that you could start delegating some of the ‘everyday’ work? The right hire could help you maintain social media, help you stay in contact with existing clients, collate articles for newsletters, format documents, etc. All the while leaving you free to focus on getting in new business.

Have you got a clear job description?
If the job you’re advertising is a little vague, the responses are likely to be equally vague. Instead, take time to come up with a job description that spells out the specific responsibilities of the new employee. By clearly defining the job it will help ensure that you pick a truly qualified candidate. Also, the more detailed the job description, the easier it will be for you to set benchmarks to measure the new hire’s performance.

Can your network help you find your employee?
My strongest piece of advice is to start looking as early as possible and the best way to do this, for the least expense, is to begin with friends, social media and networking opportunities. Hiring an employee recommended by someone you trust in your network can take away much of the uncertainty and increase the chances for a successful fit.

Are you hiring someone with your skills?
It’s easy to feel that what your business needs is another you. Is this really the case? Could your business achieve even more with a little diversity. For example, do you really need someone that is as outgoing and gregarious as yourself? Could your sessions benefit from a great Trainer with a more reserved and attentive approach?

What are the long term plans for new staff?
Where do you see your business in the next couple of years and how will any new staff fit into that picture? Most applications for any role will be curious as to where the role may be headed. What sort of opportunities will there be for growth, either in hours or professionally?

How will the new employee add to your bottom line?
Your first employee is a huge financial investment, so how exactly are they going to make your business more profitable? Will they be running sessions so that you can focus on bringing in more business? Will they permit you to work with larger groups? Or is it simply about giving you time to step away from the business and re-charge on a regular basis?

Does the candidate suit the culture of your business?
Before committing to a new hire, be confident that the potential employee matches the sort of culture you are wanting to create within your business. Will the candidate be a good representation of the type of people you want to attract in the future?

Can you count on your first hire to stay a while?
The first employee will come to know the company inside and out, so it’s important that he or she is eager to grow with the business. Make sure you understand the person’s reasons for joining and the experience he or she is seeking with your business. Less employee turnover will save you time, money and stress.

Putting on your first staff member can be a daunting prospect. If you’re about to take this step and are interested in speaking to another fitness employer about how things work for them, please get in touch. We have many industry contacts that are happy to share experience and provide recommendations.

Naturally, if you’d like assistance in connecting with great candidates, please get in touch.

Regards,

Dennis Hosking

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